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Schnitzler Syndrome
The classic feature of Schnitzler syndrome is the chronic, urticarial rash that does not generally present as itchy (pruritic), but can progress to being more pruritic. The rash generally is present on the torso, arms and legs, but is not often seen on the head, neck, palms of the hands, or soles of the feet. The rash may be seen daily, or only a few times a year. At least 90% of patients can have recurrent fevers that can present daily, or only a few times a year. The fevers often can be over 40ºC, and can last for 1-2 days. Chills are not common, and the rash does NOT always occur along with the fever. Many patients have joint pains, especially in the hips, knees, wrist and ankles. Some patients may have arthritis, but joint destruction has not been reported. Less than half of the patients with this disease have bone pain, usually in the tibia (one of the lower leg bones) and the iliac bone. Patients suffer from felling ill, and fatigues, and can experience weight loss. Some patients may have enlarged lymph nodes, livers and or spleens.

For more information about diagnostic critieria, please go to this site http://schnitzlersyndrome.com/index_files/criteria.htm. We have used schnitzlersyndrome.com as a resource for the content for this page, and recommend that patients with this condition should visit their site and contact them for more information.